Hello. Today I am going to be looking at our biochemical data, in a new way. 

We have been speaking for a while about further breaking down our biochemicals, making it possible to use filters in our search to find stable isotopically labelled products. 

Today I am going to look at how we’ve done this, and which products in this segment of the biochemicals market are performing the best. 

Robert Best Ede’s chemistry set, England, 1840-1900. Credit: Science Museum, LondonAttribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

Stable isotopically labelled biochemicals are products that have one or more elements in the compound replaced with a non-radioactive isotope, allowing observation of the compound throughout a reaction, or within a cell for example. 

An example of this would be replacing a common hydrogen atom with deuterium, or using 13C in place of 12C, and 15N in place of 14N. These labelled products can then be identified through mass spectrometry or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 

For my analysis today I have looked at over 10,000 products with a label in the CiteAb database. These come from 34 different suppliers. 

Leading with the most citations for labelled biochemicals is Cambridge Isotope Laboratories, Inc. The self-described ‘world leader’ of stable isotopes and stable isotope labelled compounds offers an extensive supply of deuterated compounds together with carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 labelled compounds. 

Cambridge Isotope Laboratories’ top-cited product is D-Glucose (U-13C6, 99%). The company actually provides five of our top ten cited labelled products. 

Millipore Sigma also features highly in this market, again providing five of the top ten cited products. This is not surprising given the company’s size in the biochemicals sector as a whole. 

Other suppliers that feature are Perkin Elmer, Cayman Chemical, Santa Cruz Biotechnology, C/D/N Isotopes and Avanti Polar Lipids.  

In the future I’d like to look at supplier trends in this market – we can see which suppliers are currently claiming the lions share of citations, but is this stable or have there been changes? 

Are there any specific insights you’d like to see from this market? Or do you have any questions about this or any other part of our biochemical data? If so [drop me an email], I’d be happy to have a chat with you. Keep an eye on our blog for more updates in the near future. 

And today I am giving away data for the top ten cited stable labelled products for free. To get your copy sent to your inbox, sign up below. 

– Rebecca and the CiteAb team

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